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Performance Evaluation of RC Beams with Dramix Steel Fibres

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Abstract:
This paper presents a study on the flexural performance of reinforced concrete beams with Dramix steel fibres. The effect of fibre content on the strength and ductility performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams having different fibre volume fractions was investigated. The parameters of this investigation included service load, yield and ultimate load, service load deflection, yield and ultimate load deflection, deflection ductility and energy ductility. The fibre volume fraction Vf ranged from 0.0 to 2.0 percent. The strength and ductility performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete beams was compared with that of control beam. The test results show that addition of 2.0 percent by volume of steel fibres improves the strength and ductility performance appreciably.
Keywords: Ductility; Fibre; Steel fibre reinforced concrete; Strength.
I.Introduction
Concrete is a relatively brittle material. Addition of fibres to concrete transforms it from a brittle to a more ductile material1-4. The function of short-cut fibres as secondary reinforcement in concrete is mainly to inhibit crack initiation and propagation5. The basic purpose of using fibres is to control cracks at different size levels, in different zones of concrete (cement paste or interface zone between paste and aggregate), at different curing ages and at different loading stages6. Fibre reinforced concrete specimens, unlike that of their counterparts, do not fail immediately. After the first crack, the load is transferred from the concrete matrix to the fibres7-8. Information available on the performance of reinforced concrete beams with Dramix steel fibres is still limited. Hence an attempt has been made to study the strength and ductility performance of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with steel micro-reinforcements.

References:

  1. ACI Committee 544, Measurement of Properties of Fibre Reinforced Concrete, (ACI 544.2R-889), American Concrete Institute, Detroit, Michigan, (1989), USA.
  2. ACI Committee 544, State of the Report on Reinforced Concrete, (ACI 544.1R-82), Concrete International: Design and Construction, 4(5) (1982), 9-30. American Concrete Institute, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
  3. ACI Committee 544, “Design Considerations for Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete”, (ACI 544.4R), ACI Structural Journal, 1988, pp. 563-580.
  4. A.E. Naaman, “Fibre Reinforcement for Concretes, Concrete International: Design and Construction”, 7(3), 1985, pp. 21-25.
  5. Surendra P. Shah “Strength Evaluation and Failure Mechanisms of Fibre Reinforced Concrete”, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Fibre Reinforced Concrete, India, 1987, pp.1-18.
  6. M. Nehdi and J.D. Ladanchuk, “Fiber Synergy in Fiber-Reinforced Self-Consolidating Concrete”, ACI Materials Journal, 101(6), 2004, pp.508-517.
  7. S.K. Kaushik, V. Kumar,and V.P. Bhargava, “Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Concrete: A Review”, The Indian Concrete Journal, 2001, pp.515-521.
  8. F.Faisal, Wafa and A. A. Samir, “ Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete”, 89(5), ACI Materials Journal, 1992, pp.449-455.